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1. Face on Mars: The creepy “face” on Mars is probably the most famous image, first captured by the Viking 1 and 2 orbiters.

NASA


2. Blueberries: Well, clearly they are not blueberries, but they sure look like them! There is an entire field of these super round, bluish rocks.

NASA


3. Dust Devil: The Opportunity rover caught this dust devil on camera, confirming scientists’ theories that the little twisters occur on Mars.

NASA


4. The Bone: Conspiracy theorists went crazy when images of this bone-shaped rock appeared on Mars’ surface.

NASA


5. Morse Code: Morse code… from space? These sand dunes on Mars look eerily similar to morse code, prompting scientists to translate them to this message: “NEE NED ZB 6TNN DEIBEDH SIEFI EBEEE SSIEI ESEE SEEE.”

NASA


6. The Pyramid: This clearly looks like a pyramid. NASA, however, has downplayed it. “It is a rock,” said Dr. Jim Bell, right, of the Curiosity program.

NASA


7. The Hole: Located near Mars’ south pole, this perfectly shaped hole caught the attention of scientists, who could see the frozen carbon dioxide ice at the bottom. The hole is estimated to be a few hundred meters across — now that’s a big hole!

NASA


8. The Iguana: “To say it’s just a rock would be very closed minded to the evidence at hand,” said owner of the UFO Daily Sightings Blog, Scott C. Waring.

NASA


9. Jelly Donut: NASA’s Opportunity found this rock that looks strangely like a jelly donut, but when it went back to check it out, it was gone. Turns out the rover’s wheels accidentally ran it over and flipped it in another direction.

NASA


10. Dragon Scales: These scaly-looking hills have been nicknamed “The Dragon Scales” for their uncanny similarity to reptilian skin. NASA believes these to be the remanence of ancient rivers.

NASA


11. The “Jake Matijevic” Rock: This striking rock caught the attention of NASA’s Curiosity rover as she was exploring the area. The rock (named Jake Matijevic after a prominent engineer) is made of unusual minerals typically found in Earth’s core.

NASA

 


12. Avalanche: When temperatures start to warm up in the spring, melting ice and frost (made of CO2 on Mars) can trigger avalanches down steep cliffs, like this one here photographed in 2010.

NASA

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