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20 FAMOUS MOVIE SCENES INSPIRED BY ART

When it comes to making a film, most directors try to execute a vision that’s in their head. But sometimes, they also end up accidentally (or deliberately) copying a masterpiece of art, and it makes the film that much better.

These are pretty, effin’ cool.


Miramax Films

There Will be Blood (2007)


Wikipedia

Study (Young Male Nude Seated beside the Sea) by Hippolyte Flandrin, 1835


Warner Bros.

Dreams (1990)


Wikipedia

Wheat Field With Crows by Vincent Van Gogh, 1890


20th Century Fox.

History of the World: Part I (1981)


Wikipedia

The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci, late 15th century


The Weinstein Company

Django Unchained (2012)


Wikipedia

The Blue Boy by Thomas Gainsborough, 1779


Focus Features

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)


Wikiart

To Prince Edward Island by Alex Colville, 1965


Columbia Pictures

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1988)


Wikipedia

The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, 1486


United Artists

Pennies from Heaven (1981)


Wikipedia

Nighthawks by Edward Hopper, 1942


Warner Bros.

Empire of the Sun (1987)


Wikipedia

Freedom from Fear by Norman Rockwell, 1943


Sony Pictures Classics

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus (2009)


Wikiart

Young Corn by Grant Wood, 1931


PIcturehouse

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)


Wikipedia

Saturn Devouring His Son by Franciso Goya, 1823


Warner Bros.

Barry Lyndon (1975)


Wikipedia

The Dance/The Happy Marriage VI: The Country Dance by William Hogarth, 1745


Zentropa

Melancholia (2011)


Wikipedia

Ophelia by Sir John Everett Millais, 1851


Warner Bros.

The Exorcist (1973)


Wikipedia

The Empire of Lights by René Magritte, 1954


Universal

Psycho (1960)


IMDB

House by the Railroad by Edward Hopper, 1925


Pathé

The Girl with a Pearl Earring (2003)


Wikipedia

Girl with a Pearl earring by Johannes Vermeer, 1665


Warner Bros.

Heat (1995)


Wikiart

Pacific by Alex Colville, 1967


New Line Cinema

The Cell (2000)


Wikipedia

Dawn by Odd Nerdrum, 1989


New Line Cinema

About Schmidt (2002)


Wikipedia

The Death of Marat by Jacques-Louis David, 1793


Focus Features

Lost in Translation (2003)


Artnet

Jutta by John Kacere, 1973

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