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39 IMAGES OF SLUM LIFE IN NEW YORK IN THE EARLY 1900s –

 

 

 

Mulberry Bend Park – Columbus Park, formerly known as Mulberry Bend Park, Five Points Park and Paradise Park, is a public park in Chinatown, Manhattan, in New York City. During the 19th century, this was the most dangerous ghetto area of immigrant New York, as portrayed in the book and film Gangs of New York. Back then, the park’s site was part of the Five Points neighborhood, in the area known as Mulberry Bend, hence its alternative names. It was renamed Columbus Park in 1911.

 

 

 

“Knee-pants” at forty-five cents a dozen – A Ludlow street sweatshop Knickerbockers, knickers, or kneww-pants are a form of men’s or boys’ baggy-kneed trousers particularly popular in the early 20th century United States. Golfers’ plus twos and plus fours are breeches of this type. Before World War II, skiers often wore knickerbockers too, usually ankle-length.

 

 

Home of an Italian ragpicker – Ragpicker, or chiffonnier, is a term for someone who makes a living by rummaging through refuse in the streets to collect material for salvage

 

 

 

 

Hell’s Kitchen, sometimes known as Clinton, is a neighborhood on the West Side of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. It is traditionally considered to be bordered by 34th Street to the south, 59th Street to the north, 8th Avenue to the east, and the Hudson River to the west.

 

 

 

Headquarters of the Whyo gang, Bottle Alley The Whyos or Whyos Gang, a collection of the various post-Civil War street gangs of New York City, was the city’s dominant street gang during the mid-late 9th century. The gang controlled most of Manhattan from the late 1860s until the early 1890s, when the Monk Eastman Gang defeated the last of the Whyos. The name came from the gang’s cry, which sounded like a bird or owl calling, “Why-oh!”

 

 

 

The Short-Tail Gang, Corlears Hook, under the Pier at the foot of Jackson Street The Short Tails also known as the Short Tail Gang for their distinctive short tailed jacket coats[1] were an 1880s-1890s Irish gang located in the Corlear’s Hook section of the Lower East Side on Rivington street in the vicinity of Mangin and Goerck streets of Manhattan, in New York City.

 

 

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Getting ready for supper in the newsboys’ lodging-house Wealth flowed during the 1880s and 90s, but only to the upper echelons of society. A vast gulf opened between rich and poor, earning this era the nickname “the Gilded Age.” One immigrant photographer captured what it was like for New York’s poor during this time, and his images remain arresting today. Original photographer: Jacob Riis (1849-1914) A Danish-born carpenter who imigrated to the US in 1870. He started his career as a journalist in 1873 as a police reporter, only three years after he arrived in New York. Later he became the city editor of the New York Tribune. When flash photography was born in 1887, he and three photographer friends began to photograph the slums of New York City and three years later he published How the Other Half Lives: Studies Among the Tenements of New York with more than a hundred photographs.

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