JUMP TO COMMENTS
Previous
Next

Every comic book fan has to accept that, whether it’s the design of the costume, the origin of the powers, or the motivation of the characters, something will always be different in the adaptation from comic to movie. A lot of these changes create a cleaner, more believable narrative, but there are also the times when it clear the filmmakers had all banged their heads together really hard. These are the sort of changes that you see and go “… but why?!” Here are the weirdest changes in comic book movie adaptations!

Josh Trank’s Naked Thing

adaptations thing
(source)

To be fair, The Thing from Marvel’s Fantastic Four is an incredibly hard character to bring to the big screen. He’s a giant rock monster with huge eyebrows and an extreme under bite. But he’s also one fourth of the titular Fantastic Four, so it’s not like he can just be cut from the film. In Josh Trank’s about-to-be-released Fantastic Four, though, a whole other problem besides the difficulty in creating a real-life rock man has sprouted up — they made The Thing is naked. Why no pants? The Thing has always worn pants! If you’re CGI-ing him, you can just as easily CGI him some pants! He looks like a naked Family Guy character.

Silent Deadpool

adaptations deadpool
(source)

Deadpool is popular is because he never shuts up, but in X-Men Origins: Wolverine, his mouth is removed completely! This is like if M&Ms got rid of the candy coating and just started selling little balls of chocolate. The movie is full of other characters who make funny little quips, which shows that the studio wasn’t against one-liners, they just didn’t want them to come from the character known for making one liners. Baffling.

Zombie (?) Catwoman

adaptations catwoman
(source)

When Tim Burton first brought Catwoman to the big screen in Batman Returns, he made her less of a cat burglar who took the “cat” part of her name too seriously, and more of a resurrected cat warrior. Selina Kyle is pushed out a window and falls to her death, only for a group of cats to bring her back to life. Everyone complains that the Halle Berry’s Catwoman had nothing to do with the comic, but it is a faithful continuation of whatever it is that happened in Batman Returns.

1970’s Captain America

adaptations america
(source)

Steve Rogers was a soldier who participated in an experiment during World War II that gave him super powers. He fought for the country under the name “Captain America” and served as a symbol of inspiration for American troops. Or, he was a guy that liked to take things real easy and ride his bike around the country. In 1979, a movie was released called Captain America, but it bore almost no resemblance to the comic character. The film’s Steve Rogers was an artist instead of a soldier, and he liked to ride around the country and paint his paintings. You know, removing the whole ‘World War II icon” aspect of the character just makes him seem kind of silly.

Breathing Mask Bane

adaptations bane
(source)

In the comics, Bane gets his strength from a drug known as Venom, and he wears a luchador-style mask. In The Dark Knight Rises, that mask is replaced by a breathing apparatus that made it very hard to understand what Bane is saying and there is no mention of Venom. I know Christopher Nolan was going for realism with his movies, but how is a permanent gas mask more realistic than steroids?

Jim Carrey’s The Mask

adaptations mask
(source)

One of Jim Carrey’s earliest hits was The Mask, where he played a nerdy character with a magical mask that gives him the power of Loki, god of mischief. It sounds like family-friendly fun, but when fans of the film tracked down the comic upon which it was based, they were shocked by what they read. The Mask comic is brutal — very few pages in The Mask go by without someone being brutally murdered by the “hero”. Why someone read this comic and thought “hey, let’s turn this into kid’s movie!” is something I’ll never understand.

Scarred Nightcrawler

adaptations nightcrawler
(source)

Listen, Nightcrawler already looked weird in the comics, but Bryan Singer did an excellent job making him work in X2: X-Men United. But he just couldn’t leave well enough alone, and added even more weird, having the film’s Nightcrawler cover himself with scars of biblical symbols. This is not something the character does in the comics. Singer basically looked at the character and said “hey, if we’re going to be weird, let’s see how far we can go!”

 

What’s the weirdest change you’ve ever seen in a superhero movie?

7 Of The Weirdest Changes In Comic Book Movie Adaptations

source

JUMP TO COMMENTS
Previous
Next
Please wait...

And Now... A Few Links From Our Sponsors