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Angelika Graswald is seen in a 12-hour interrogation video taken after her arrest in her fiance's drowning death in April.

Angelika Graswald is seen in a 12-hour interrogation video taken after her arrest in her fiance’s drowning death in April.

An upstate New York woman charged with the murder of her fiancé is heard telling investigators “I wanted him dead” in a never before seen interrogation video.

Angelika Graswald’s alleged dark confession came amid an 11-hour interrogation after her arrest for Vincent Viafore’s April drowning while kayaking along the Hudson River, video obtained by CBS’ “48 Hours” shows.

“All right, I’ll give you an f—ing statement,” Graswald tells a detective, hours into the tape.

“What is it?” the detective asks.

“I wanted him dead and now he’s gone,” she replies. “And I’m okay with it.”

A newly released 911 recording captures Angelika Graswald screaming for help while searching for her fiance in the Hudson River last April.

A newly released 911 recording captures Angelika Graswald screaming for help while searching for her fiance in the Hudson River last April.

Prosecutors say Graswald was motivated to kill by greed over a $250,000 insurance payout she was due to receive should Viafore, 46, die.

She ensured that would happen, they claim, by removing a plug on his kayak, causing it to sink. They say she also pushed away his paddle as he floundered in the frigid water’s 40-degree temperatures.

In the interrogation video, removing the plug is something Graswald doesn’t seem to deny doing. But she says it wasn’t done on the day of his death but “months” earlier.

“Because you wanted him to die,” an investigator presses.

Graswald was arrested and charged with murder less than two weeks after her fiance, Vincent Viafore, drowned.

Graswald was arrested and charged with murder less than two weeks after her fiance, Vincent Viafore, drowned.

“Yes,” she responds.

At least one former detective isn’t buying her confession, however.

Jim Trainum, who previously worked with Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department, suspects that investigators “cherry-picked” her statements. He also believed they may have manipulated or coerced her into giving the confessions.

“To me this is a non crime,” he told “48 Hours.” “This is an accident that made into a criminal offense because of their gut feeling.”

Prosecutors have accused Graswald, seen here with her fiance, of tampering with his kayak, causing him to sink.

Prosecutors have accused Graswald, seen here with her fiance, of tampering with his kayak, causing him to sink.

The release of the video, as well as a recording of Graswald’s emotional 911 call, comes ahead of a CBS special “Death on the Hudson” which will air Saturday at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

In a contrasting near two-minute long excerpt of her call, Graswald is heard screaming as she claims to desperately search for her fiancé in the opaque water on the day he drowned.

“I don’t see him anymore!” she cries to a dispatcher.

“He has something that he’s holding onto but it’s getting really bad. I don’t see him anymore!”  Graswald continues when asked if he had a life jacket on.

“He had a little floating thing,” she replies before breaking away from the phone, screaming at times.

“I don’t see him. Oh my god,” she cries after several long pauses.

When directed to get herself to a nearby boat house, she initially objects.

“I’m not worried about myself. I’m worried about him,” she responds with a calmer tone.

The 35-year-old, who lived with Viafore in Poughkeepsie, was arrested 11 days later while placing flowers on Bahnnerman’s Island, where they had gone kayaking that day. Viafore’s body was recovered a little more than a month after he vanished.

An autopsy report, obtained by the New York Times, has reportedly ruled his cause of death as drowning and the manner as homicide thanks to the “kayak drain plug intentionally removed by other.”

An attorney for Graswald has slammed the homicide ruling to the Times, however, saying it’s based on police speculation and not on an examination of Viafore’s body.

A spokesperson for the Orange County Medical Examiner’s Office declined to confirm the autopsy report’s findings but defended their ruling, even if based on the kayak’s condition.

“Medical examiners in Orange County have based their manner of death findings on evidence extrinsic of the body for years. It has been accepted by this County and the state,” spokesperson Justin Rodriguez told the Daily News.

 

Source

Woman Charged With Murdering Fiancé Appears To Confess To His Death In Interrogation

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