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The New Online Scam That Claims To Have Videos Of You Watching Porn –

What would you do if you received a random email from someone claiming to have videos of you watching porn – along with a detailed history of the type of porn that tickles your fancy?

Well that’s exactly what’s been happening in a frightening new phishing scam.

The scam, called the ‘sextortion scam’ or the ‘porn blackmail scam’, is an email where the sender claims to have placed dodgy software on your internet device and has used its camera to record you watching porn – and whatever you might get up to while you watch it.

 

And, even if you’re one of those people who claim you’ve never indulged in a bit of adult entertainment, when a very convincing email claiming otherwise lands in your inbox, I challenge you not to start second-guessing every Google search you’ve ever performed.

“Why is it so convincing?” I hear you ask. Well, the subject of the email just so happens to be one of your private passwords.

In one example of the email, the sender writes: “I created a double-screen video. First part displays the video you were watching (you’ve got a good taste lol) and second part displays the recording of your webcam.”

He continues, under the heading ‘Exactly what should you do?’: “Well, I believe $1200 (£910) is a fair price for our little secret. You’ll make the payment through Bitcoin.

“You have one day to make the payment. If I do not receive the Bitcoins, I will certainly send out your video recording to all of your contacts including friends, family, colleagues and so forth.”

 

Creepy, isn’t it? But it isn’t as bad as you’d think.

In reality, the hackers don’t actually have access to your porn history – or any videos of what you may or may not get up to in private – nor have they installed any software onto your computer.

What’s actually happened is that the senders have taken your password from a leaked database available online and sent it to you, hoping you’d believe their threats and be terrified enough to hand over your virtual currency.

Brian Krebs, a leading security journalist, told The Business Insider: “It is likely that this improved sextortion attempt is at least semi-automated.

“My guess is that the perpetrator has created some kind of script that draws directly from the usernames and passwords from a given data breach at a popular website that happened more than a decade ago, and that every victim who had their password compromised as part of that breach is getting this same email at the address used to sign up at that hacked website”.”

So, if it happens to you, don’t panic and start sending over all your precious Bitcoins. Own your porn search history, change your passwords and delete the email.

You have been warned…

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