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95590-Vaccinations[1]

A vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins or one of its surface proteins. The agent stimulates the body’s immune system to recognize the agent as a threat, destroy it, and keep a record of it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimated that 732,000 American children were saved from death and 322 million cases of childhood illnesses were prevented between 1994 and 2014 due to vaccination.

Want to learn more about the topic in this week’s video? Here are some key words/phrases to get your googling started:
-adjuvant: substance added to a vaccine to enhance the body’s immune response and increase the vaccine’s efficacy.
-attenuation: altering a pathogen to make it less virulent (or even harmless).
-acquired immunity: components of the immune system that are developed via exposure to pathogens or other sources of infection.

 

Why Are There Dangerous Ingredients In Vaccines?

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